FIFA Case Note: Newell’s Old Boys v. Roma

In the summer of 2019, Roma transferred two players to Spartak Moscow for €3 million each.  The first player – well-regarded striker Ezequiel Ponce – was worth at least that much.  But the second – reserve team goalkeeper Andrea Romagnoli – was worth far less.  At the time, Roma owed a sell-on fee to Argentine …

The Accountant-Client Privilege in Illinois

Illinois recognizes an accountant-client privilege.  Though limited, it allows accountants to shield certain documents and communications from disclosure in litigation.  Source of the Privilege The privilege is codified in Section 27 of the Illinois Public Accounting Act.  In relevant part, Section 27 establishes that a “licensed or registered CPA shall not be required by any …

Definition of a Security: It’s All in the Family (Resemblance Test)

This article is the first in an occasional series on the definition of a “security.”  The answer is important.  When a financial instrument qualifies as a security, it unlocks a set of laws and regulations that would not otherwise apply.  These include two statutes that are discussed extensively below: the Securities Act of 1933 and …

FIFA Case Note: Udinese v. Paris St. Germain

Long-standing precedent from FIFA’s Dispute Resolution Chamber entitles clubs to training compensation for the period they take a player on loan.  But the right to compensation does not arise until the parent club transfers the player to a club in another association.  In other words, the time with the parent club and the time on …

On Duty: A Franchisor’s Duty to Protect

Author’s Note: This article is part of an occasional series on liability issues facing the private security industry.  Two previous articles in the series addressed negligence claims for failure to protect a plaintiff against third-party attacks, specifically, the duty element of those claims.  These articles analyzed the duty owed by security guard companies and property …

Regulatory Analysis: FINRA Rule 3270 – Disclosure of Outside Business Activity (Part II)

Author’s Note: This article is part of an occasional series on specific rules and regulations governing financial professions.  It is also the second in a multi-part analysis of FINRA Rule 3270.  Part II will analyze portions of the rule’s text that were not discussed in Part I, examine the content required for a notice under …

Regulatory Analysis: FINRA Rule 3270 – Disclosure of Outside Business (Part I)

Author’s Note: This article is part of an occasional series on specific rules and regulations governing financial professions.  It is also the first in a multi-part analysis of FINRA Rule 3270. THE RULE FINRA Rule 3270 – Outside Business Activity of Registered Persons No registered person may be an employee, independent contractor, sole proprietor, officer, …

Not Exceptional Enough: Oscar Bobb’s Uselessly Close Article 19 Case

Article 19 of FIFA’s Regulations on the Status and Transfer of Players remains a tough wall to clear.  Generally, the rule bars clubs from signing foreign players under age 18, except in three limited circumstances.[1]  The most controversial of these is exception (a), which allows the transfer if the player’s parent moved to the new …

On Duty: Property Managers that Hire Private Security Guards

Author’s Note: This article is part of an occasional series on liability issues facing the private security industry.  The first article, On Duty: Private Security Companies and the Threshold Element of a Negligence Claim, was published on April 3, 2020.  Like the previous article, this one begins with a hypothetical: Picture a hypothetical company, which …

The Nature and Extent of Arbitral Immunity

While the COVID-19 pandemic has shuttered much of the country’s judicial machinery, courts have released opinions on matters argued prior to the stoppage.  Two recent federal court opinions – Cherdak, out of the D.C. District[1] and Lanza, decided by the First Circuit[2] – touched on an issue with relevance to financial professionals: arbitral immunity.  This …